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M.AD Insighter Series

Steve Heller, Best-Selling Author and Design Leader

Apr 06, 2022 - 04:00pm

Overview

Steve Heller: I hope I can provide you guys with some entertainment here. I do want to say, whoever designed this did a wonderful job. I love it. I love the school’s new identity. I love the animation and I’m fond of that silhouette. I’m going to talk to you today about my own obsessions […]

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Steve Heller:

I hope I can provide you guys with some entertainment here. I do want to say, whoever designed this did a wonderful job. I love it. I love the school's new identity. I love the animation and I'm fond of that silhouette. I'm going to talk to you today about my own obsessions and how obsessions become work and how work becomes love and how love becomes passion and comes around again to work. If you're not passionate with what you're doing, what's the point? My passion has been excited by being in the design field and illustration fields and pop culture fields for many, many, many decades. So I'm going to take you on a little tour of what has made me interested in it without going into a great deal of detail.

Steve Heller:

It's more of a sampler, and it's going to show you where certain of my books come from. I've published 200 books. Co-authored, co-edited, or single authored. I work with a lot of great collaborators. Without them, I couldn't do anything. And I've written, as Hank said, hundreds, maybe thousands of articles. Some of them are good, some of them are not. This is me, it's my son's shoulder. I think I'm the only dad that I know at any rate whose son gave himself a tattoo of good old dad, done by Christoph Niemann. That was me when I was a young kid in New York. We had to learn how to use weapons quickly. I went to a military school for a short time where I learned how to be an anti-war activist. I briefly went to the School of Visual Arts as a student, but was asked to leave because I didn't go to any classes.

Steve Heller:

Then oddly enough, they asked me to come teach a couple of years later. And for the last 20 years, 25 years, I've been co-chair of this MFA program. This was one of my offices at the New York Times when I was working on the op-ed page. I found it recently. I started looking back at the wonderful years I had working at the New York Times. And this is me lately. Stress has gotten the better of me. Even preparing for this talk has stressed me out a little bit. So you'll see the coming down portion as we go through. I started my career doing underground and tabloid newspapers, cultural, musical, political. I was art director of Rock. I designed the logo. I'm not a great designer, by the way. I was a designer for Andy Warhol's interview, which has changed radically over the years, but somebody should have stopped me from using Broadway type with Basorama. My type choices have never been keen.

Steve Heller:

This is the New York ACE, which was an underground paper in the 1970s, in New York city. And we were competing against the East Village Other, which was the largest of the underground newspapers in the US. When I got my job at the New York Times, it was as the art director of the op-ed page. I was 23, 24, and it was the only job I ever really wanted. So I got it when I was 23, 24, I kept that particular job for about two and a half or so years. And then I became art director for almost 30 years of the New York Times Book Review. What the Book Review gave me was a chance to play with illustration and every so often to play with the format of the New York Times. As you can see, the logo Book Review is radically changed by Chris Ware, the wonderful comic strip artist. He even changed the name plate of New York Times to one that was used in the 1920s.

Steve Heller:

Nobody looked over my shoulder then. And when finally the design director got copies, he said, "Don't ever do that again." I did it one more time and we're still good friends. But what I'm going to talk about really is an addiction. It is said that if you do have addictive problems, you should let them out, let people know about them. I'm not trying to make light of addictions because addictions come in all shapes and forms and workaholism is as much of an addiction as alcoholism, but these are my addictions. Filling up large spaces with tons of ephemera and materials that relate to graphic design, to visual communication, to propaganda, to textual and visual manipulation and communication.

Steve Heller:

This was an apartment that I had especially made for a collection. I take some medications, I take medications that will decrease desire or decrease bad taste, or reduce my longing or relieve a need to buy. Otherwise, if I missed a dose, I'd look like this. And this is a film of that room that you saw a snippet of, done by my son, New York Nico, who is a film maker who has been working tirelessly, keeping businesses alive in New York during the pandemic. Every object here has some meaning to me, not so much in a personal way, but in a historical way. They represent different aspects of how capitalism and communism were sold to the world in the 1900s.

Steve Heller:

So you'll see how this all contextualizes as I go through the talk. These are some more of the addictions. I work a lot with design reference books and journals, as you'll see. Product mascots and mini mannequins are something that has been important to me, ads, tins, boxes, displays, all sorts of commercial ephemera, designed ephemera. I took special interest in art deco. In fact, a book that I gather many of you were using in your classwork for Hank is Designed Graphic Style. And that's where I break down the major styles that have been associated with not just graphic design, but with furniture and fashion and art and architecture.

Steve Heller:

I collect artifacts that I can then deconstruct in some way. These were just simple advertisements for various products throughout the world, but they had one thing in common. They connected to one another through typography, stylized typography, stylized illustration, modernism as a movement and as an idea come into play commercially. And what happens is when I've done a considerable amount of research, which includes obtaining materials, like what you've just saw, I'll go into libraries, I'll go into other institutions and I'll find documentation. And I'll come up with a book. In this case, it's Euro Deco, which I did with my wife, Louise Fili. We've done 15 books together. I mentioned mini mannequins. They're a unique and special aspect of the commercial culture. They were countertop displays. They sold everything from hardware to fashions.

Steve Heller:

There's one here that my wife won't even let me keep in the house. So in my office here, it's sitting on a shelf, and that's the one she just couldn't abide by that. Out of these forms comes a certain surrealism, an aspect of data. Everything that was avant-garde was trickled and transferred and filtered into the commercial realm. They also have their own inherent beauty, an ideal beauty, perhaps a false beauty based on the dominant American themes of their era. Again, what I do is once I've got enough critical mass of these things, I write stories about them. The stories are often based on fact, interviews, research, but I try to write history as though it were a story rather than just a pure polemic or a pedantic essay. So Counter Culture, the allure of many mannequins became a book, and it has a fun essay in it.

Steve Heller:

Jumping from three dimensional objects, two dimensional artifacts type is our language. It's our lingua franca. So very early on, I started collecting as much typography as I could. The way type was sold, the way type was designed, what type meant is expression, what type meant is function. So I have a very large collection of sample and specimen sheets, which are now flooding the internet on Instagram and Twitter and Facebook. People are collecting these things all over the place. I would collect them in various different forms. For me, there's a high typography, there's a low typography, and then there's a mass typography. This particular scrim from a bus would represent that mass typography. Letter forms that are used to convey a very practical message.

Steve Heller:

One of my students did this film, which is based on a book that I did. That was 100 years of typography in a minute. That comes basically from this book, Typology, that I did with Louise. I believe there are two kinds of histories. There's live history and dead history. Dead history is the kind that's stuck in the factual past or the mythic past, but it doesn't move. It doesn't groove. It doesn't allow you a chance to interpret or use it as a basis for inspiration. What I try to do with history is make sure that students ingest it while having fun working with it. It's not to say they should copy the past, but it is to say that they can be influenced by the past. So, I've done many books on aspects of vintage type and graphic design. This one came out right about the time of the pandemic. Again, Louise and I did this. It's part of a two set series.

Steve Heller:

There are many different dialects of type. There are many different kinds of type. I deal mostly with Latin or Western type. I have always wanted to dive into more type designs from the far east, the middle east, syllable areas from Africa, from native peoples in the United States. But I've pretty much stayed with the Eurocentric forms, because those were what I learned most about. But I've broken them into various different segments. This is the dimensional segment. Type can be used in two dimensional space but with three dimensional illusion. And that's what designers are called upon to do often, make illusions. Illusions are wonderful because they're playful and because you have to involve yourself in the illusion. Like a Trompe l'oeil, where is that fake fly painted on a great master painting?

Steve Heller:

Shadow type, as I said, gives a boldness, it creates optical illusion. It gives the sense of volume. And so, after collecting many, many examples of this, we came out with a book called Shadow Type, which is a part of a four volume series that includes Script, Slab Serif, and another one you'll see momentarily. And that other one has to do with Stencil. Stencil is probably the oldest form of Western type we know. It was used as display going back to the early part of the 19th century, if not before. This was one used as essentially a logo brand mark. It's two color piece. You'd cut the letters, meaning you had to have great skill, and you'd put them together and they would create shadows, but in different colors. Here's another one. These things have lasted over 100 years, probably 120 years. They were created on very strong paper by some very crafty people.

Steve Heller:

The stencil has symbolic virtues. It represents industry. Stencil was used to mark boxes and sacks and all sorts of early 19th century commodities. It also represented industry because stencils were used in industrial contexts on products and the like. This is a Paul Rand piece using stencil as the logo for El Producto. And the reason was, is when El Producto was transferring its tobacco from place to place, it was put in bales and those bales were anointed with black ink through a stencil that said El Producto. So he basically just took the 19th century version of the El Producto logo and made it 20th century. And that became Stencil Type, the book I did with Louise.

Steve Heller:

This represents another facet of my passion, and that's magazines. I started working in magazines and newspapers. I'm still a magazine hoarder, even though they've been reduced to very few. One of the books that I wanted to do was to chronicle all of the avant-garde magazines because during the 10s, the 20s, the 30s, graphic design, the new trends, the new fashions and the new experiments in graphic design were conveyed to people through the designs themselves, posters and books and the like, but also through magazines that represented different ideologies, movements, and other ways of thinking differently about graphic form. This is a magazine called Wendingen. It came from Holland. This is a Belgian magazine called [inaudible 00:21:41]. The whole piece was done as a wood cut. There were many issues of it. And it was like the internet of its day. People had ideas, they wrote what we would call blogs in the magazines. And they went from gallery to gallery, from artists to artists, and they passed on the different protocols, the different aspects of design.

Steve Heller:

This is one of the early political magazines that was produced, or newspapers produced by the [inaudible 00:22:20] Movement, particularly John Hartfield and George Gross, means every man, his own football, which of course has a nonsense meaning and a nonsense cadence. But it's also the first time political photo montage is used in a newspaper magazine. This publication is Romanian. The Romanians had an avant-garde writing about it tomorrow, actually not this particular one, but other things in my daily Heller column. Romania was on the low end of the avant-garde spectrum in Europe during the 10s and 20s, but it still had one and Integral was their publication. It was put together with pieces of type furniture from type cases. This was a polish avant-garde magazine, which looks very much like it could have been done yesterday. In fact, I've seen a Paul Rand piece that looks exactly like it. And the book that came out of all of this was called from Mertz to Emigre and Beyond. And it's one of my favorite of all books that I've done.

Steve Heller:

I've also been a collector and out of necessity, a researcher of graphic design magazines, because that's where the history is told. That's where you get, not unvarnished, but original source material. All trade magazines varnished their products. They were selling things. They were selling graphic design and printing materials to the trade. So one of the most important of the trade magazines was Das Plakat. The poster was German and it was representative of the friends of the Poster Group in Germany before and immediately after World War I. Das Zelt is another journal. This is more like a blog. It was done by a man named Ehmcke who was a trademark designer. This is one of his trademarks. The whole issue was devoted to his trademarks. It's rather complex, but at the same time, very simple and direct and represents the birth of the modern trademark.

Steve Heller:

In Holland, as in many other countries, there were advertising trade magazines. De Reclame was a Dutch version. And every issue, they would have a cover that showed a different graphic style. In this case, I don't even know what you would call it, but it came at a period of art deco. And this one comes out of a cubistic background, also De Reclame on 1929. These things are wonderful to see because they put you in the period that you're studying or I'm studying. It requires translation, but once translated, there's some interesting facts that come from these publications. This is another one called Reklama. There were a few different magazines that used the same terminology, which means advertising, but this was done in Czechoslovakia in the 1950s. So this was during the Soviet and Communist governments in Czechoslovakia. They didn't have a lot to sell, so they didn't have a lot to advertise. So there's a very limited amount of content.

Steve Heller:

The look of things try to be avant-garde, but they don't quite get there. And that became a book called 100 Classic Graphic Design Journals, most of which belong to me. I've done many profiles on designers of all kinds and of all media. I've done three or so, maybe more, biographies of designers who are considered important for any number of reasons. Paul Rand was the first biography that I did. When I started out, I didn't really appreciate his work. And then one day I had an awakening and I saw what craft, what art, what conceptual acuity was in his work. So these are just some samples from what I used in the book. He was an advertising art director, he was a book designer, book cover designer. And he was obviously a corporate art director who created logos and what was then called corporate identity and now called branding for Westinghouse and IBM, et cetera.

Steve Heller:

This was part of an ad campaign that he would do every week. There would be, or sometimes every day, there would be a advertisement for an El Producto cigar using his drawing and the cigar as the motif. This is one of his book covers for vintage books and it makes use of collage and type and handwriting. He wasn't a calligrapher. He was a hand writer. Similarly, he's taking a photograph and making an abstraction out of it. And then in the 1950s, he is called upon to do something he had never really done before. And that was transform the graphic look of corporation IBM and he created a revised or refreshed logo for it. They were using Stimi bold. He used City bold and started slowly but surely recreating their entire visual image until he got to this scan line, IBM logo, which represents a lot of things to a lot of different people. But to him, it represented contrast.

Steve Heller:

He'd play around a lot. I have dozens, in fact, hundreds of his sketches. He was always drawing. One thing I tell students all the time is doodle. Doodle, doodle, doodle, because that's how you think. He created the Westinghouse brand using Westinghouse's iconic W and a bar underneath the W. And in his Rand's case, he made the bar into a lozenge and he made the W into what could be interpreted as a schematic electrical drawing. But many people thought of it as a crown for a king. He would disassemble his own work to help designers in the companies, in specially created design academies to learn how to design using the systems better.

Steve Heller:

So my book, after he passed away, I wrote the obi on him in the New York Times and that led to the book, Paul Rand. A couple of years ago, I did this book for Moskin and Princeton architectural press, which is a collection of many of his sketches. And they go from being well thought out to just doodles, but it really shows his process. Another biography I did, this one in conjunction with this man's white widow. This is Alvin Lustig. And I worked with Elaine Lustig Cohen on the book, because she had all of Alvin Lustig's materials. He was well known as a book jacket designer using abstract art as the basis of his book jackets, using iconography that has a child-like quality to it, but is really quite sophisticated. And then when he got tired of doing the same things, he tried something else. This is actually a photograph of a blackboard on which he puts metal type.

Steve Heller:

He had a number of different approaches, but they always turned out to be Lustig's, which means he worked in ambient styles, but he injected his own personality. This is an early issue of industrial design magazine, which he designed the first two issues of. It's quite a beautiful cover and has both practical and symbolic significance. And this is a cover that he did for Fortune, which is one of the most beautiful magazine covers ever without cover lines. He did more than graphic design. He did industrial design, even though he wasn't trained as such. He designed this two seater helicopter for [inaudible 00:32:19]. I wouldn't ride in it, but it did work. And it looked very much like his paramount chairs.

Steve Heller:

One thing always led to another inspirationally. This was an office that he designed at Look Magazine. It was his design group, which was an experimental design group that was funded by the magazine and the company Look. The photo on the wall belonged to [inaudible 00:32:58]. But what was interesting about this is that he designed all the furniture and he designed the furniture to be transparent. So you see these cubby holes are hanging, were held up off the desk. So there was desk space, and at the same time, people could see who they were talking to in the office. And that became a book called Born Modern: The Life and Work of Alvin Lustig, which was designed by Elaine Lustig Cohen's daughter, Tamar.

Steve Heller:

I did a lot of work in uncovering the work of Alex Steinweiss, who was the first person to introduce record album covers in the United States. Now, there were record albums and they were called albums because in fact, they looked like albums. They were for 78 RPMs. So there were maybe in any given album, there were four or five discs that were in craft paper coverings, and they stood on a shelf in a hardware store or a music shop. There were no such things as record stores, and they were spying out. So Alex Steinweiss, who was pretty young at the time, said, "I bet you, I can increase sales by putting an original piece of art on the front of an album and let it sit front out instead of spine out." And that's what he did. The first album he did, the sales increased by 800%.

Steve Heller:

Steinweiss gave up doing all of this when he was around 50, because that's when rock and roll started happening and his work was anything but rock and roll. It was jazz, it was folk, it was popular. This is one of his covers. This is another for Marches. He was influenced by the French poster artists. So there's a lot of poster-looking work here, as well as smidgens, if not more than smidgens of abstraction. And this was the book that came out of that, which Taschen published in three different sizes. This I think was the big size. It was huge and a beautiful testament to the man's work. Fortunately, it was done while he was still alive. And speaking of jazz, that's what modernism seems to be about to a great degree.

Steve Heller:

Modernism is a way of thinking. It's a spirit, it's an essence. It is translated in many different visual forms. It was primarily European, but it was also considered a universal language. I was very, how shall I put it, anti-modern for many years. As I was growing up, I thought it was very uninclusive. It was a very corporate cold sensibility. What I was really thinking of was the coldest part of modernism. There's a whole range of modernist practice and a lot of it is warm and inclusive. Command Records was one of the big exemplars of using modern design in their record covers. So this is symbolic of trombone playing. Charles Murphy was one of the many designers who worked for Command Records.

Steve Heller:

Modernism also incorporated classicism. Classic images were used and modern devices were used as well. George Juicy, who did this cover, shows that modernism can be very personal, very expressive drawing in this Albert Camus book. Walter Allner created modernist covers for Fortune Magazine in the early 50s using geometry as his fundamental formal language. And that became the book called The Moderns that I did with Greg D'Onofrio. These are just some pages from that book. This is Joseph Albers and one of his Command Records. It really does illustrate that title, Provocative Percussion. This is George Juicy, who you just saw his interiors magazine making use of collage.

Steve Heller:

[inaudible 00:38:38] was one of America's most important interpreters of European design in the US. Robert Brown John who later became Brown John Shamiah from [inaudible 00:38:55] was also a key player. Sadly, he died of a heroin overdose in London where he went to work after leaving his partnership. The book is basically dedicated to a man named [inaudible 00:39:13], who was an American designer, grew up in California, who used the scriptures of modernism, the same type faces in the same sizes. There were no hierarchical sizes, but he used geometry and other abstract forms to convey the message.

Steve Heller:

So you look at these things and I used to look at these things and think they were boring. But something happened in my synapses and I started realizing not how clever they were, not how smart they were, but how effective they were, how they tickled my eyeballs. Lillian Baseman is one of six women in the book. Women were not given their due in the 1940s, although there were a number of them working in the design fields. She took on Junior Bazaar, which was executive art directed by Alexey Brodovitch, who didn't want her to have credit as art director in the magazine. And she put it in anyway and said, "[inaudible 00:40:34]." She made quite a splash for herself in the magazine field and then switched over to photography and became a highly reputable photographer.

Steve Heller:

Another of my fascinations, I wouldn't call it passion, but certainly fascination is how symbols work in our culture and how different symbols mean different things to different people. One of the symbols that most impacted me as a kid and later as an adult was the swastika, and still is. So I started looking for swastika lore, swastika history, and found that it had a super long history going back perhaps to pre-history, where it was used as a good luck charm. Swastika is a word that comes from Sanskrit, for good luck. It was used commercially by many companies before the Nazis took it over. The Nazis taking it over, there is argument and debate these days that it's not even the swastika, that it's the hooked cross or the hacking cruise of Hitler's sick imagination. But the form is basically the same. But what would be called backwards or forwards, the swastika was used in many different contexts.

Steve Heller:

This was the corn palace in South Dakota, where it was used as a good luck charm with all those arabesques. This was used by the Girls Club as their highest award. They published a magazine called The Swastika. And then it comes all the way back to, what does the swastika mean to those who have to endure it and suffer from it and relate to it in negative terms? We come back to the swastika being used in awkward ways. This is a restaurant in Thailand, which was called Hitler's Cross. For what reason I know not. And this is using the swastika as a negative against cigarettes. It's an anti-smoking cigarette symbol, but the argument is whether it works or not. So I did a book called The Swastika Symbol Beyond Redemption, which Hank used in a number of his classes, his 5:30 in the morning classes, which I was once young enough to do.

Steve Heller:

Then I did two follow up books, one, The Swastika Symbols of Hate. That happened after the Trump became president and we started seeing an outburst of hate crimes and other nativist experiences. That's the one that's out now. And there was a revision in between of swastika. I also am fascinated by how branding, which is such a common term and has become so much a part of our design industry, has been used so effectively for totalitarian regimes. Basically, it's about making trade characters. So Hitler as Mr. Clean, Mal, Mussolini. Basically, even though one is comic and commercial, the other is using the same methods of commerciality to sell an ideology.

Steve Heller:

I'm fascinated by how children were sucked into the Fascist and totalitarian vortex. This is just one example of a child's toy that was sold in Fascist Italy. And this was a handbook for the girls group. Women didn't have a lot of rights in Fascist Italy, and girls were basically bred to take care of the men. And this is their handbook. This is the young Nazi youth in Austria before and after the orange list. And this is the little red book of Mao's China, which was the Bible of the Red Guard, which were made up primarily of teenagers. And this was a young pioneer in the Soviet Union. In the United States, the camps would be called red diaper baby camps.

Steve Heller:

I do this all because it's coming back and we see it more and more. We're in very treacherous times. We see right-wing populism growing in this country and in others. Countries that were homes to democracy are now using symbols that relate back to the Nazi period and used gestures that return to the Nazi period with a Communist period. There's still vandalism using the swastika. So when people tell me, "Give it a break, forget the swastika. It's going to go away." I'm reminded that it doesn't go away. I'm going to show you now just a bunch of books that I've done, that I'm proud of.

Steve Heller:

Rants and Raves is basically my attack on different aspects of popular culture that need to be called out for one reason or another. This was a cover by George Louis. It's the only cover that he did that never got published in Esquire. And this is a book by Upton Sinclair who was a great progressive writer, and it was about race and racial relations in the 20s and 30s. This is my book, Graphic Style. This is the third of four editions that Hank tells me he uses. This is a book that I did with Veronique Vienne, 100 ideas that changed graphic design. Each one is a little mini history of aspects of tropes conceits of design. Right before the pandemic, this book on Teaching Design History came out. And I must say, it's gotten stale since the pandemic, because so much now has been done on African-American design history, which has been ignored for so long and other native or native histories.

Steve Heller:

Icons of Graphic Design is a book that Mirko Ilić and I did together, which basically shows examples of where design comes from. We also did one called Anatomy of Graphic Design, and it shows that graphic design doesn't just come from the earth fully formed. It has to borrow, it has to adapt, and it has to be influenced by many different forms. Style Pedia is a book that Louise and I did. It's a collection of essays on different quirks and mannerisms of design. Mirko and I did this book on Lettering Large, which is basically lettering in the environment and used in architecture, used as architecture, used as decoration on a large scale. And just for cheap thrills, I did a couple of type books or type products that could be used for one's enjoyment, like this typographic gift wrapping. And this one I'm very happy with, although it didn't get much distribution. This is called Type Deck. It's a series of flashcards that give you the history of typography from the early Victorian period to the present.

Steve Heller:

With Lita Talarico, who I co-chair the MFA program here, we've done a few books together and we've done books on sketchbooks. There's nothing I love more than to look at somebody's sketchbook and see how they think. We did two books, one called, I can't remember what the one was called, Typographic Sketchbooks, and this one Freehand New Typography Sketchbooks. Anytime I'm invited to work on a project that has something to do with old lettering, I'm there in a second. And this was Esther Smith's book on the Spec Chromatic Type done by the William Page company. And this is a book I did with Gail Anderson. Gail and I have done about 15 books together. This was part of a series on custom type. This is new ornamental type. We did new vintage type and we did new modern type. This year we came out with expressive type. I forget what the name of the book is, but it's a nice one.

Steve Heller:

This is another book I did where I take apart different people's work and show the user how to not recreate the exact piece, but how to use some of the techniques. Mirko and I did a book for Shakespeare's 300th anniversary or what we think it was, of all the posters that we could find that were beautiful, that were done with Shakespeare as their focus. And this is a book that's become very obsolete that I did with Veronique Vienne called Becoming a Graphic Designer. And this one's called Becoming a Graphic and Digital Designer. This book was one of my biggest selling books in its first three editions, and then design just changed and has changed.

Steve Heller:

I did a fun book on how failure makes design viable, how we learn from failure. James Victory did this cover to underscore the idea of failure. This is another book of my essays, how popular culture is shaped by graphic design. I've done two additions with Veronique Vienne of Citizen Designer about social responsibility. And I've done two additions of Teaching Graphic Design. This is the second. I've done three additions of The Education of a Graphic Designer, which invited 50 different design educators, both professional design educators and part-time educators who were practicing design to offer their philosophies and interests in the practice of design teaching.

Steve Heller:

The Teaching Graphic Design book was all syllabi. Because I believe writing and research are key to the new designer and the old designer and because I co-founded the writing program at the School of Visual Arts for design. I did a book on writing and research. With Seymour Chwast, who I've done maybe 20 books with, we did an illustration history. I have to say though, it's not one of my favorite books, but I do love the cover. Most recently, this just came out this past month. Seymour had the idea of doing a book where we describe all the ways hell is perceived throughout the world. So we have 86 different hells in here, and it turned out to be one of my favorite projects.

Steve Heller:

I'm going to end on the cover for the book that Hank mentioned. It's a memoir of 10 years of my life in New York, working on underground newspapers, working for underground papers, doing activism where I could, meeting people who have become cultural icons and talking about difficulties of growing up. So it's a coming of age book. And as Hank said, I'm co-chair of MFA Design. We're about to enter our 25th year and we are all back in school. It's been a wonderful experience to be back, even though we're all wearing masks and distancing. But the year of living safely was not my happiest year.

Steve Heller:

These are people I want to thank for collaboration over the years. And this, by the way, is what that room turned into. We had to leave the townhouse that we were in, so that entire apartment got stripped down. Half of the materials were given to libraries and sold, and the other half, I don't know how I fit it in our new apartment, but it's there. I just can't get to anything. Thank you.

Tyler:

Thank you so much for tuning in guys. My name is Tyler. I'm going to be one of the admissions advisors helping you guys to start your creative careers here at the Miami Ad School with our four portfolio programs, art direction, copywriting, photography and video, and design, as well as our boot camps. We are well equipped to make you well equipped for the creative industry. And my job is to help you transition smoothly from prospective to enrolled student. We have financial aid and scholarships available for all of our portfolio programs and our four US locations, Miami, Atlanta, San Francisco, and New York, as well as our international locations are ready for you guys to go ahead and enroll when you are ready. So feel free to go to our website, www.miamiadschool.com, hit apply now, start your application. And if you have any questions, set up a call and we will be happy to help you.

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Portfolio Programs – Jan 17, 2023 @ Noon EST
Boot Camps – Jan 19, 2023 @ Noon EST

Sign up below for your invitation!

Ready for a new career? Apply by December 1, 2022.

Get the training you need to be a creative leader. 

Learn from the best. Develop your skills. Become who you’re meant to be.

Schedule a Call

This is your chance to meet a MAD career advisor. They can answer all your questions about the application process, choosing a speciality, and building your career.